What you need to know about the Bracero Program

A new program aimed at helping seniors living with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease get more physical activity and reduce their risk of heart attacks and stroke is getting its first trial in the United States.

The Braceros program, named Bracers, aims to make a difference by helping seniors get more exercise and reduce the risk of stroke and heart disease.

The program is based on a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association last year, and it aims to help about 200,000 seniors through the end of the program’s first year.

The study looked at the Braceros program and found that it did work.

The researchers also found that the Bracers program was more effective than other interventions for seniors who have Alzheimer’s, dementia and other dementia-related conditions.

“This is the first randomized controlled trial of Bracercals intervention on this condition,” said lead researcher Dr. John P. Fenn, an assistant professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Colorado, Denver.

“We think it’s the best way to help this population.”

Braceros has been available in the U.S. since 2013, and the first trial will be conducted this fall.

The goal of the Bracs is to provide a unique and effective physical activity program to seniors with these conditions.

The main component of the study was to measure the physical activity levels of seniors who were enrolled in the Brancers program.

Researchers measured the amount of time they spent walking, running, swimming, or jogging and the level of their blood pressure, which was measured with a computerized blood pressure monitor.

They also measured levels of markers for inflammation and other markers that are associated with the condition of dementia.

A total of 1,938 seniors who received Bracergues intervention completed the study.

The group that received the most exercise in the study, which included about a quarter of the seniors who participated in the trial, had lower blood pressure and higher levels of inflammation markers.

“I was surprised at the fact that the people who did the most with exercise had the lowest risk of developing dementia,” Fenn said.

“The blood pressure markers were not very good and there was no benefit in the level, so we’re very excited about the results.”

The researchers found that after the seniors were enrolled, they were significantly less likely to develop heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, including cardiovascular death, if they continued to get regular physical activity.

“If we can make this work for our community, we’re going to have a tremendous impact,” Fenna said.

The research team is continuing to investigate whether the BrACeros program can be used to help others with these types of conditions.

More to come on the study of the bracero and the Braccercs.